Budget Consultation 2022-23

As a society we’re continuing to adapt to the everchanging demands of living in a world during a global pandemic. Residents have shown tremendous strength and community spirit over the last couple of years, with hundreds of you volunteering to help the vulnerable and thousands of you coming forward to be vaccinated.

While the true cost of coronavirus goes beyond just financial implications, the total amount spent by the council so far stands at around £65m and although there have been government grants, they haven’t been enough to match the strains on services caused by the virus as well as some people being unable to pay business rates and Council Tax as a result of the pandemic.

We have faced more than a decade of funding cuts as part of the government’s austerity measures, which have drastically reduced the money given to us from £103m in 2010-11 to £76m in 2022-23. This decrease in spending power has gone hand-in-hand with an increase in demands on our services – estimates suggest around 30,000 more people live in our borough than in 2011 with almost 10 per cent being over the age of 65.

What’s more, for every £10 we spend, £7 goes on caring for the most vulnerable people in our community before we can do anything else.

Only through sound financial management, and with your backing, have we carefully managed this squeeze on our finances during the pandemic.

As a council, we have a legal duty to deliver a balanced budget, which is why we have once again pressed the government for more help, but once again they’ve left many local authorities trying to make already overstretched budgets go even further.

How we do that is becoming increasingly difficult as the demands – and costs – continue to rise.


Help us invest in your future

Our approach is, and continues to be, to invest in the future of our borough to generate growth and opportunities, while modernising how the council operates to deliver the best value for money to taxpayers.

Unfortunately, without government backing, the only way we can continue to provide key services for the most vulnerable in our community is through an increase in Council Tax.

We know the cost of living for is going up for everyone right now, which is why we don’t take the decision lightly to propose a Council Tax increase of 1.99 per cent, with a further 1 per cent increase to be ringfenced to pay for adult social care. In total, this would mean paying an extra 78p per week for the average band D property (excluding the GLA element).

This rise means we do not have to cut back our support and services for the most vulnerable in our borough – something we simply would not do, particularly with so many people struggling as a result of the pandemic.

That is one of the reasons we plan to invest £11 million over the next four years into improving the lives of children, young people and families through our early help service, which will provide immediate interventions on a range of issues to help minimise the distress to people’s lives and reduce the impact on taxpayers.

Since COVID-19 has changed the way we all work, we want to make sure we provide a council that caters for the new world, which is why we’re investing in new technology that will meet your online and digital needs and keep your data safe.

We’re also forging ahead with plans to build hundreds of new homes in the borough, becoming one of London’s most sustainable places to live, as well as attracting new, greener industries to the borough that will provide jobs for thousands of residents.

We’re also investing in building a district heat network to provide sustainable heating to many homes and we’re investing in attracting new businesses to the borough, for example the Film Studios coming soon to Dagenham.

Our borough faced many challenges before the coronavirus outbreak and with the uncertainty of the pandemic it is likely we will face many more. Since the government has refused to help with the everchanging challenges, we have no other choice but ask for your support.


As a society we’re continuing to adapt to the everchanging demands of living in a world during a global pandemic. Residents have shown tremendous strength and community spirit over the last couple of years, with hundreds of you volunteering to help the vulnerable and thousands of you coming forward to be vaccinated.

While the true cost of coronavirus goes beyond just financial implications, the total amount spent by the council so far stands at around £65m and although there have been government grants, they haven’t been enough to match the strains on services caused by the virus as well as some people being unable to pay business rates and Council Tax as a result of the pandemic.

We have faced more than a decade of funding cuts as part of the government’s austerity measures, which have drastically reduced the money given to us from £103m in 2010-11 to £76m in 2022-23. This decrease in spending power has gone hand-in-hand with an increase in demands on our services – estimates suggest around 30,000 more people live in our borough than in 2011 with almost 10 per cent being over the age of 65.

What’s more, for every £10 we spend, £7 goes on caring for the most vulnerable people in our community before we can do anything else.

Only through sound financial management, and with your backing, have we carefully managed this squeeze on our finances during the pandemic.

As a council, we have a legal duty to deliver a balanced budget, which is why we have once again pressed the government for more help, but once again they’ve left many local authorities trying to make already overstretched budgets go even further.

How we do that is becoming increasingly difficult as the demands – and costs – continue to rise.


Help us invest in your future

Our approach is, and continues to be, to invest in the future of our borough to generate growth and opportunities, while modernising how the council operates to deliver the best value for money to taxpayers.

Unfortunately, without government backing, the only way we can continue to provide key services for the most vulnerable in our community is through an increase in Council Tax.

We know the cost of living for is going up for everyone right now, which is why we don’t take the decision lightly to propose a Council Tax increase of 1.99 per cent, with a further 1 per cent increase to be ringfenced to pay for adult social care. In total, this would mean paying an extra 78p per week for the average band D property (excluding the GLA element).

This rise means we do not have to cut back our support and services for the most vulnerable in our borough – something we simply would not do, particularly with so many people struggling as a result of the pandemic.

That is one of the reasons we plan to invest £11 million over the next four years into improving the lives of children, young people and families through our early help service, which will provide immediate interventions on a range of issues to help minimise the distress to people’s lives and reduce the impact on taxpayers.

Since COVID-19 has changed the way we all work, we want to make sure we provide a council that caters for the new world, which is why we’re investing in new technology that will meet your online and digital needs and keep your data safe.

We’re also forging ahead with plans to build hundreds of new homes in the borough, becoming one of London’s most sustainable places to live, as well as attracting new, greener industries to the borough that will provide jobs for thousands of residents.

We’re also investing in building a district heat network to provide sustainable heating to many homes and we’re investing in attracting new businesses to the borough, for example the Film Studios coming soon to Dagenham.

Our borough faced many challenges before the coronavirus outbreak and with the uncertainty of the pandemic it is likely we will face many more. Since the government has refused to help with the everchanging challenges, we have no other choice but ask for your support.


Page last updated: 13 January 2022, 13:26